Na'ama Wasserman, Psy.D.

Psychotherapist located in Uptown, Chicago, IL

About Na'ama Wasserman, Psy.D.

We live in complicated times. On the one hand, we seem to be blessed with limitless possibilities, avenues for growth, channels to communicate with others and access to new information. Yet creating meaningful relationships, feeling comfortable with who you are and managing the stress of daily living are all just as challenging as ever. Moreover, in the face of distress we may feel more isolated and distinct than ever.

I try to help people face these challenges by offering a space where they can safely explore the underlying causes of their distress, consider their self defeating patterns, grieve losses and safely revisit traumas. I've always been fascinated by stories and believe that we each have a unique story to tell. I believe that when we narrate our lives to another person something magical happens that can begin to create new meaning and change. As I get to know you, I may suggest alternative ways your story may be read, and together we may consider new approaches to your struggles.

I have 20+ years of experience treating individuals from adolescents to seniors experiencing a variety of mental health challenges including depression, anxiety, severe trauma, chronic illness, grief and loss. My therapeutic approach is informed by psychodynamic theory, but I may help you develop new skills by offering techniques taken from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, DBT and mindfulness training. My style is warm, informal, curious and my level of directiveness could be tailored to your needs.

I earned my BS degree from the University of Oregon and my Doctorate (Psy.D.) degree from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology. I have been the director of a mental health program in a Social service agency, where I helped many individuals transform their lives for the better. I am always awed by the resilience and health that could be uncovered in us all, given a relationship that authentically nurture our strengths and uniqueness.


Suddenly, and without any warning, we are living through an unprecedented global crisis, a scenerio that had previously been the domain of disaster movies and has now become our daily
reality. Few of us have ever had to deal with a crisis of this magnitude, potentially threatening our health and that of loved ones, our jobs and access to basic resources. The things we rely on
as anchors in our lives, such as our relationships, routine and our various social roles, have been dramatically disrupted and we have no idea how long before they are restored. This
situation has produced anxiety, dread and a sense of helplessness in all of us as we try to navigate these uncharted waters. People who live alone and those who struggle with mental
health issues are especially vulnerable. but even those who have not struggled with such issues
in the past are now facing real emotional challenges.


So how do we cope with all this? Here are commonly recommended strategies that can help us
stay centered while sheltering in place:

● Take time to connect. Reach out to friends and family frequently, and consider Facetime and other visual ways to stay in touch. While we are told to create social distance, this may be a time to bridge the emotional distance between us.
● Routines keep us grounded and give us a sense of control in the face of uncertainty. Try to stick to your usual schedule of bedtime and morning hours, meals, exercise and leisure and don’t stay in your sweats all day!
● Just as important: look for unique opportunities that this crisis presents. Social distancing may offer a new appreciation of our emotional connection to the people in our lives and our increased vulnerability can draw us together. Reach out to someone in your life in a new and meaningful way that the usual frenzy doesn’t allow. You may also want to renew your relationship with yourself. Use this crisis as an opportunity for individual growth. Get to know yourself better: what’s important to you? How will this experience change you?
● Spend time outside: despite the surreal circumstances, Spring is upon us and with better weather and longer daylight hours, this is the time to take long walks or bike rides, possibly with a friend - with a safe distance between you.
● Focus on the moment and stay in the present. When you find yourself worried about all the possible “what ifs,” calmly bring yourself back into the moment: focus on what is right before you through the senses, and remember that this very moment “is all we have.” Youtube videos, virtual classes and apps about mindfulness, yoga and meditation are very popular now and for good reason.


And finally - get professional support. Get in touch with your therapist, or reach out to one if you are currently not in therapy. Uptown Psych is offering telehealth based therapy and psychiatry, and most insurance companies have recognized the need and swiftly moved to authorize such benefits. It may be a bit of a challenge technologically and psychologically to get comfortable in a digital session, but I have been surprised how quickly my clients and I were able to adapt . As always, Therapy can help bring you back to the present, provide perspective and give you permission to express your feelings. Once communicated to another person, even our most catastrophic fantasies may be sorted out into something much more manageable and realistic. Don’t try to go it alone; we are here for you.

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,  Office of Na'ama Wasserman,  Psy.D.

We live in complicated times. On the one hand, we seem to be blessed with limitless possibilities, avenues for growth, channels to communicate with others and access to new information. Yet creating meaningful relationships, feeling comfortable with who you are and managing the stress of daily living are all just as challenging as ever. Moreover, in the face of distress we may feel more isolated and distinct than ever.

I try to help people face these challenges by offering a space where they can safely explore the underlying causes of their distress, consider their self defeating patterns, grieve losses and safely revisit traumas. I've always been fascinated by stories and believe that we each have a unique story to tell. I believe that when we narrate our lives to another person something magical happens that can begin to create new meaning and change. As I get to know you, I may suggest alternative ways your story may be read, and together we may consider new approaches to your struggles.

I have 20+ years of experience treating individuals from adolescents to seniors experiencing a variety of mental health challenges including depression, anxiety, severe trauma, chronic illness, grief and loss. My therapeutic approach is informed by psychodynamic theory, but I may help you develop new skills by offering techniques taken from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, DBT and mindfulness training. My style is warm, informal, curious and my level of directiveness could be tailored to your needs.

I earned my BS degree from the University of Oregon and my Doctorate (Psy.D.) degree from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology. I have been the director of a mental health program in a Social service agency, where I helped many individuals transform their lives for the better. I am always awed by the resilience and health that could be uncovered in us all, given a relationship that authentically nurture our strengths and uniqueness.


Suddenly, and without any warning, we are living through an unprecedented global crisis, a scenerio that had previously been the domain of disaster movies and has now become our daily
reality. Few of us have ever had to deal with a crisis of this magnitude, potentially threatening our health and that of loved ones, our jobs and access to basic resources. The things we rely on
as anchors in our lives, such as our relationships, routine and our various social roles, have been dramatically disrupted and we have no idea how long before they are restored. This
situation has produced anxiety, dread and a sense of helplessness in all of us as we try to navigate these uncharted waters. People who live alone and those who struggle with mental
health issues are especially vulnerable. but even those who have not struggled with such issues
in the past are now facing real emotional challenges.


So how do we cope with all this? Here are commonly recommended strategies that can help us
stay centered while sheltering in place:

● Take time to connect. Reach out to friends and family frequently, and consider Facetime and other visual ways to stay in touch. While we are told to create social distance, this may be a time to bridge the emotional distance between us.
● Routines keep us grounded and give us a sense of control in the face of uncertainty. Try to stick to your usual schedule of bedtime and morning hours, meals, exercise and leisure and don’t stay in your sweats all day!
● Just as important: look for unique opportunities that this crisis presents. Social distancing may offer a new appreciation of our emotional connection to the people in our lives and our increased vulnerability can draw us together. Reach out to someone in your life in a new and meaningful way that the usual frenzy doesn’t allow. You may also want to renew your relationship with yourself. Use this crisis as an opportunity for individual growth. Get to know yourself better: what’s important to you? How will this experience change you?
● Spend time outside: despite the surreal circumstances, Spring is upon us and with better weather and longer daylight hours, this is the time to take long walks or bike rides, possibly with a friend - with a safe distance between you.
● Focus on the moment and stay in the present. When you find yourself worried about all the possible “what ifs,” calmly bring yourself back into the moment: focus on what is right before you through the senses, and remember that this very moment “is all we have.” Youtube videos, virtual classes and apps about mindfulness, yoga and meditation are very popular now and for good reason.


And finally - get professional support. Get in touch with your therapist, or reach out to one if you are currently not in therapy. Uptown Psych is offering telehealth based therapy and psychiatry, and most insurance companies have recognized the need and swiftly moved to authorize such benefits. It may be a bit of a challenge technologically and psychologically to get comfortable in a digital session, but I have been surprised how quickly my clients and I were able to adapt . As always, Therapy can help bring you back to the present, provide perspective and give you permission to express your feelings. Once communicated to another person, even our most catastrophic fantasies may be sorted out into something much more manageable and realistic. Don’t try to go it alone; we are here for you.


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Accepted Insurance Plans

Please call if you have any questions about our insurance plans.

Blue Choice Health Plan
Blue Cross Blue Shield
ComPsych
Genesight
Magellan Health
Medicare